Program of studies




The official teaching language is Greek.
For courses taught in English, please visit the following link:
http://compus.uom.gr/erasmus/?q=en/course_list

No available information for this program of studies


The curriculum of the Technology Management Department is arranged in eight semesters and encompasses six courses per semester. English language courses are offered during the first two semesters, increasing the total number to seven courses per semester.

The available taught courses are organized in thematic areas aimed at co-ordinating course content and avoiding overlap or fragmentation of knowledge. The thematic areas analyze and specialize the cognitive areas discussed in the previous paragraph in order to provide a seamless set of subjects and to accurately determine the expected outcome, namely the profile of the Department?s graduate. These subject areas do not imply a compartmentalized program, viz. students are not expected to choose a pathway between Management and Technology or Digital and Telecommunication Technology. The courses of the first three years are compulsory, while, during the fourth year, elective courses are offered and the possibility of a graduation thesis is given. The specific goal of the curriculum is the familiarization with different kinds of knowledge and the combination of diverse areas as provided in the constitution of the Department.

The thematic areas are the following:

Thematic Area

General Description

Management and Entrepreneurial Innovation

Students acquire the necessary knowledge that is related to the modern entrepreneurial and administrative environment.

Production and Management Technologies

Students examine the impact of technology on business administration itself and on generating products and services.

Technology

Students delve into certain technologies, in accordance with the background and the goals of the Department.

A more specific analysis of the thematic axes, with emphasis on the final learning outcomes per thematic area ensues below.


Thematic Area

Particular Thematic Categories, Goals

%

#

Management and Business Innovation (43%)

Organization and Management. Personnel Management, Production Management, Services Management, Quality Management, Strategic and Entrepreneurial Planning, Marketing and Sales, Distribution and Support, Decision Taking and Support, Technology and Innovation Law Issues

26

13

Entrepreneurial Innovation. Techno-Economic Surveys and basic Financial Management, Evaluation and Financing of Technological Investments, Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Research and Development of Products and Services, Technological Change Management.

17

10

Production and Management Technologies (17%)

Production and Management Technologies. Information Systems in Management and Business, Planning Business Processes, Electronic Administration and Business, Design Systems and Design of Products and Services.

17

9

Technology (40%)

Digital Technologies. Hardware and Software of Digital Systems Administration, Distributed Systems, Embedded Systems.

17

9

Telecommunication Technologies. Telecommunication Systems, Internet and Applications, Wireless?Mobile?Broadband Telecommunications.

23

11

%: respective percentage, #: number of courses

The particular thematic categories presented above, also constitute the following Department?s Sections:


  1. Organization and Management (OM)

  2. Business Innovation (BI)

  3. Production and Management Technologies (PM)

  4. Digital Technologies (DT)

  5. Telecommunication Technologies (TT)


The curriculum consists of 62 courses in total. 40 of these course are compulsory and 22 are electives. Every student must follow 10 of the available 22 elective courses (5 per semester 7 and 8) or 8 of them (4 per semester 7 and 8) if he/she chooses to carry out a graduation thesis. In the aforementioned compulsory courses 10 foundation courses are provided, namely 4 courses in Mathematics (MA), 4 in Information Technology (IT) and 2 English Language courses (EL).

Therefore, the subject areas analyzed above cover a total of 52 semester-long core courses. The weight (%) each particular thematic area carries is shown in the previous table, and so is the number of the corresponding courses.

It is evident that the inclusion of a course into a thematic area contributes to the specification of the course?s material, especially in several cases of knowledge domains that could be approached by different aspects, depending on the point of view of the Department, the Section, or the Instructor. The foundation courses are covered mainly by instructors of the Sections.


The distribution of courses per semester (across the 4-year course of studies) is presented in the table below. In the last year and in grey background the elective courses are indicated. Each student must select 5 of them per semester, if he/she is not taking up a graduation thesis, otherwise he/she must select 4.


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

EL

EL







MA

MA

MA

MA





IT

IT

IT

IT





OM

OM

OM

OM

OM

OM

OM

OM






OM

OM

OM







OM

OM

BI

BI

BI


BI


BI

BI







BI

BI







BI

BI




PM

PM

PM

PM

PM





PM

PM

PM

PM

DT

DT

DT


DT

DT

DT

DT







DT

DT

TT

TT

TT

TT

TT

TT

TT

TT




TT



TT

T


The weight of all courses, regarding credits, is the same, i.e. 5 credits; hence, every semester offers 30 credits, apart from the first two which offer 35, summing a total curriculum amount of 250 credits.


Brief analysis of the groups of courses


Foreign Language

Only English courses (I & II) are available and are compulsory for all students. The syllabus includes practice in reading skills and terminology through academic texts on economics, business and computer-related topics, academic writing and oral presentations.


Mathematics

Mathematics I-II cover selected syllabi of differential and integral calculus and linear algebra, based on the use and applications of mathematics in management and economics on the one hand, and in digital and telecommunication technologies on the other. Another course introduces the principles of statistics and probability so as to enable inference, estimating and forecasting on techno-economic issues. The last course of this group covers the fields of operational research, simulation, and other quantitative methods of supporting managerial decision-making.


Information Technology

The courses of this group start with an introduction to personal computers, the applications of information technology and the basic working environment; they continue with two programming courses, whereby issues of software design with contemporary methods are covered, and they conclude with a course on databases.

Organization and Management

The introductory course deals with the basic knowledge concerning management and operation of enterprises and organizations, and their relation to technology. Then, the areas of products and services marketing are covered. Manufacturing and operational management is divided into successive courses, starting with a general course and continuing with human resources management, supply chain management and logistics, and project planning and management. Coming next are business policy and strategy issues, and total quality control both in management and production. Finally, students are given a choice of elective courses on legal aspects of innovation and technology (patents, intellectual rights etc.), specialized chapters of applied statistics and quality control, combined optimization and multi-criteria decision support systems.


Business Innovation

The business innovation course group combines courses in economics with courses in entrepreneurship and innovation. In early semesters, courses dealing with financial, accounting and financial management of enterprises are offered. Additionally, issues related to modern forms of funding and the influence of internal and external environment of an enterprise are examined.

In later academic semesters, the focus shifts on developing innovative business thinking, management of technological change, research and development of new products and services, and managing financial risks. Emphasis is given in enabling the student to have a comprehensive knowledge of developing a small business from a technological, administrative and financial standpoint.

Production and Management Technology

The introductory course explains the basic concepts of information systems as applied to management and business. Other courses study the analysis, design and technologies of information systems development in relation with the overall structure and operation of an enterprise or organization. Furthermore, a course covers issues of organizations? strategic alignment to their information systems by means of relevant business architectures. There is also a course that examines the principles and technologies of product and services design (CAD technologies) and manufacturing technologies (CAM/CAE). In the final year, there are four courses that deal with issues of electronic commerce and entrepreneurship, with electronic business administration and electronic governance, business modelling and advanced information systems.


Digital Technology

The basic principles and applications of digital systems are initially presented and issues of digital systems? logic design and binary arithmetic are covered. Next, the architecture and organization of microprocessors and microcomputers are presented. Following is a course on operating systems used in computer systems, while in the third year the focus falls on distributed systems, middleware and distributed applications. Moreover, the digital ecosystem of embedded systems is presented, while in the fourth year 4 elective courses are offered. The 2 winter semester courses discuss the process of design, verification, programming, production and packaging of digital products on one hand, and on the other the modeling of digital systems through hardware description languages. During the spring semester, a course on parallel processing is offered along with a course on simulation techniques, which goes into issues of mathematical and practical foundation of system verification.


Telecommunication Technology

The first course constitutes a broad introduction to computer networks, describing their implementation and operations protocols. The second course presents a general introduction to telecommunication systems and their applications, while the next course discusses the physical and theoretical background of digital telecommunications and data transmission. Two courses follow covering the Internet, the first discussing primary protocols, and the second regarding information management in the World Wide Web protocols. The next course studies the administration and security of telecommunication systems. Then, aspects of wireless and mobile telecommunication standards and their applications are discussed. Fourth year elective courses include broadband network technology and services, the convergence of telecommunication systems with other systems of communications and services, the transmission and management of a high volume of multimedia data and, finally, the design and implementation of web-centered software applications